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LITURGICAL CALENDAR 2017 with Carmelite Feastdays

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The  calendar  is  based  upon  the  General  Roman  Calendar,  promulgated  by  Pope  Paul  VI  on February 14, 1969, subsequently amended by Pope John Paul II, and with the supplement of the Carmelite Feast-days. This calendar has been updated to reflect the names and titles of the various liturgical days in conformity with the Roman Missal.

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Liturgical Year A

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The liturgical year begins with First Sunday of Advent, which starts four Sundays before Christmas (December 25). In this Liturgical year, 2017, Circle A, the Church meditates on the Gospel of Matthew and uses it for most of Sunday readings  (St. Luke for Circle B and St. Mark for Circle C). St. John, who appears several times in the Liturgy of the Word of almost all three years, is offered in a special way during the time of the Lord's Passion.

The Way of the Cross with Carmelite Saints

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prepared by Carmelite Vocation and WebTeam

THE CARMELITE SAINTS in their prayers and reflections reveal a deep communion with the Passion of Jesus. In the light of Christ crucified they beheld the depths of the heart of God and discovered there as well the meaning of the human heart.

One of the most fruitful practices of Christian piety is known as The Way of the Cross (or Stations of the Cross), a devotion that in all probability dates back to the era of the first Christians.

Carmel and Our Queen

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Jesus and Mary are always together in time and in eternity. This mysterious and comforting truth has been voiced and lived since the dawn of Christianity.

Jesus and Mary are associated as Son and Mother, Redeemer and Coredemptrix of sinful humanity,

The Carmelite Marian Tradition: The Seventeenth Century

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Matthew Sprouffske, O. Carm.

Another great Carmelite Marian writer of the seventeenth century was Father Stephen of St. Francis Xavier, famed especially for his interest in Carmel’s Third Order. In his Exhortations Monastiques, a series of conferences touching on all things Carmelite, Father Stephen has left us a clear description of the relationship which must exist between Our Lady and the Carmelite.

Brothers of the Blessed Virgin Mary

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Charles Haggerty, O. Carm.

We often hear and read the title of the Carmelite Order. Here we wish to explain it and show its significance and appropri­ateness. But that we might best understand it, we will have to consider it according to the mind of the people of the Middle Ages. For it was during the Middle Ages that the Order was forced to defend not only its title, but its very existence.

Here's What People On Twitter Say They're Giving Up For Lent

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Sam Frizell

All over the world, people are giving up on things, like their New Year's Resolutions, failed relationships, and fixing the WiFi router.

But believe it or not, some people are actually giving things up as a form of religious penitence and holy atonement.

Pope Francis' Guide to Lent: What You Should Give Up This Year

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Christopher J. Hale

Christians around the world mark the beginning of Lent with the celebration of Ash Wednesday. This ancient day and season has a surprising modern appeal. Priests and pastors often tell you that outside of Christmas,

The Ecological Originality of Pope Francis

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Fr. Eduardo Agosta Scarel, O.Carm.

Soon we will reach the first anniversary of the launching of the much awaited and much critiqued encyclical Laudato Sì (hereafter LS) of Pope Francis, on the care of the earth, our common home.

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As Carmelites We live our life of allegiance to Jesus Christ and to serve Him faithfully with a pure heart and a clear conscience through a commitment to seek the face of the living God (the contemplative dimension of life), through prayer, through fraternity, and through service (diakonia). These three fundamental elements of the charism are not distinct and unrelated values, but closely interwoven.

 



by Dr. Radut